Saturday, November 22, 2014

Top 5 ways to keep your computer and identity safe during the holidays

Don't click on links in emails. Go directly to the website to check on orders.
Traditionally, phishing and malware attacks rise during the holiday season as online impersonators try to trick shoppers users into installing malware or providing personal information.

Before the holiday season starts, take some time to learn tips to make your online experience safe and insure a smooth celebration.

1. Don't click on emailed order confirmations or shipping links

This time of year, scammers take advantage of increased online buying and the corresponding package deliveries. They use fake order information and shipping notifications as a method to infect PCs and grab personal details. These fake notifications often look very close to the real version. When in doubt, don't click directly on order confirmations or shipping links within the email. Go directly to the retailer’s or shipper’s website by typing the address into a web browser to verify order and shipping information.

2. Don't respond to password requests, even from your bank

Your financial institution will never e-mail you asking for your password or any other information. Emails requesting that you use an embedded link are an attempt to scam you into surrendering private information for identity theft or other unauthorized purposes. Legitimate organizations should never request sensitive information in this manner. Instead of clicking on a link, type the legitimate URL to your financial institutions in your browser to access the web site.

3. Unless 100% certain of the source, never open attachments

When the sender is known and the attachment is in doubt, contact the sender directly and verify the legitimacy of the attachment.

4. Nice sentiment, but don't open online greeting cards

Each holiday, you can expect a flood of e-greeting cards from friends and family wishing you a happy holiday. While seemingly harmless, these holiday greetings can be dangerous. They may contain harmful viruses or may be used for identity theft. E-greeting cards are best not to be opened, and especially should not be opened using a work computer.

5. Carefully review all email, delete any suspicious ones

If the email is suspicious, do not click on any web link or open any attachment.

Two possible ways to evaluate emails are:
  • Move your mouse over a link without clicking it; you can often see the actual destination URL address underlying that link. If the now visible URL doesn’t look like an address that belongs to the legitimate site, be extra careful. If it appears to be legitimate, still be careful, the hackers are getting creative in this area as well. Instead, go directly to the website you know.
  • Often times, but not all the time, the “To” list of the email has multiple names that do not make sense for the subject matter. Delete these emails.

BONUS

6. Safe Computing Tips for the office

In the workplace, you are the first line of defense and the best defense. Be skeptical of work and personal email that you’re not expecting and that is from unknown sources or just looks suspicious. When in doubt, contact your local help desk to verify any suspicious emails.

What tips do you have?

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Some decisions are easy

Sign on the way to Mellisoni Vineyards, Chelan Washington.

Some decisions are easy.

Some are not.

What's been keep you up at night?

Monday, August 18, 2014

Let's talk Facebook and share a cup of coffee

Tomorrow's "When to boost Facebook posts," marks the fourth event in KGW's Social Media and Digital Marketing series. Each event features a specific business interest for those who use social media as part of their outreach efforts.

As a social media fiend, I am especially looking forward to tomorrow's event with Krys VanSlyke. He's the Senior Manager of Social Media for G/O Digital, a division of Gannett – KGW's parent company.

Senior Manager of Social Krys VanSlyke
I sat down with VanSlyke this morning to glean some insight on how his team in Phoenix is using Facebook. It's pretty fascinating what they can accomplish with a target and the right budget. Doesn't have to be large, it just has to be enough.

Their work runs the gamut of one-man shops to national corporations. Each company has it's own goal, VanSlyke's team creates the strategy, creates the ads, does the testing, optimizing and resetting to figure out how to hit those goals.

Most of the tools G/O Digital uses are readily available to anyone who wants to run an ad campaign on Facebook.Should you do it on your own? Sure. If you want to practice guesswork and ride the slow train.

Or you can take the fast track. VanSlyke says his team knows what questions to ask to get the campaign focused on the right targets and G/O's proprietary tools allow them to do more testing, do the testing faster, and build on areas creating success.

And VanSlyke emphasizes team.  "If someone gets stuck they're not alone."

So, if you're in the neighborhood tomorrow at 8:00 a.m., drop in for a jam packed morning of Facebook advice and a great cup of coffee.

Here's the scoop:

Parking

Plan on arriving early. Visitor parking in our lot is limited. If you miss out on a visitor spot, please do not park in spots marked reserved. These are provided to other tenants in our building. On-street parking is available along Jefferson Street, but we've got a full house, so if you're a teensy bit late you might have to hoof it a bit.

KGW Studio, 1501 SW Jefferson St, Portland OR 97201

Remember pen and paper

Summaries but not the full deck. Our presenters share their summaries, but don't dish out the whole enchilada. That means you'll want to take notes. If you arrive empty handed find me quick and I'll fix you up with pen and paper.

Bring a business card

The sponsor CenturyLink Business usually brings some bling so remember your business card in case there is a drawing or someone you want to connect with later.

Do you Twitter?

#KGWSoMe is the event hashtag. We're hoping to have a live stream so you can ask questions, so bring your smartphones and tweet away.

Contact me to set up a marketing consultation, to get updates on the next event, or to grab a cup of coffee: cdoane (at) kgw (dot) com.





Sunday, August 17, 2014

Coping with a son's mental illness propels Pamela Deane's career

In any given year, an estimated 22.1% of Americans ages 18 and older suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder. That means that one out of every five people you work with may be suffering with an illness that you cannot see, that you may experience as you interact with them, and an illness that may or may not be curable.

Pamela Deane, author of The Translation of Max.
Author Pamela Deane had that experience not at work, but in her home.

While raising two sons as a single mom, her eldest was diagnosed with schizophrenia mid-way through his high school journey.

Throughout the turmoil of discovering it wasn’t a teenager experimenting with drugs or alcohol, juggling an unpredictable home life which spilled out and created chaos throughout her day teaching high school English, Deane managed to survive. She managed to raise both sons to adulthood. She managed to maintain classroom order and keep her teaching job, but most importantly she secured resources for her firstborn to improve his quality of life.

While not autobiographical, Pamela Deane’s book, The Translation of Max, introduces us to Maggie whose experience mirrors Deane’s own.

The book will inspire you to celebrate Maggie and the steadfast way she pursues the quest to help her son, the heartache she feels as she understands the limbo her younger son vacillates in when Maggie's life is drained of energy, time and money, and the honest way she admits when she is too tired to do it all.

The Translation of Max is sprinkled with nuggets of humor which allows the reader to chuckle and take a breath before the onslaught of ordeals that escalate one after the other. It will keep you reading until the end.

Meet Author Pamela Deane

Friday, August 22, 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
The Breakfast Club
Umpqua Bank
720 Esther St
Vancouver WA 98660



After retiring from teaching Pamela Deane launched her writing career. The Translation of Max is her second book and is recommended for anyone facing a family crisis. It is available on Amazon.